Second European Conference for Automotive History

To be held in the Louwman Museum in The Hague in The Netherlands, on 29-31 March 2019. Please find the leaflet with the programme and booking form (see attached link). The organisers are very grateful to all the speakers who include many members of Automotive different societies. The organisers hope that there will be an even larger number of delegates than at last conference at Mulhouse in 2017.

Global Automobilization papers called

Journal of World History Special Issue on Automobilization

by Ben Fairfield

Your network editor has reposted this from H-Announce. The byline reflects the original authorship.

Type: 

Call for Papers

Date: 

October 24, 2018 to May 1, 2019

Subject Fields: 

World History / Studies

The Journal of World History

Global Automobilization: An Underexamined Transnational Revolution of the Last Two Centuries

Special Issue Editors: Prof. Simon Gunn (University of Leicester), Prof. Fabio López Lázaro, (University of Hawai‘i), Dr. Susan Townsend (University of Nottingham)

This Special Issue of the Journal of World History invites article manuscripts that address any aspect related to the global, transnational, and cross-cultural histories of automobilization, automobilism, anti-automobilism, de-pedestrianization, and re-pedestrianization.

In recent decades, heated scholarly debates about the internal and external combustion engines’ effects on human lives around the world since the 1800s have taken place, but these issues have been investigated as global phenomena primarily within sociology and urban studies rather than in the fields of transnational and world history. Nevertheless, historians have been prominent in advancing our understanding of the complex economic, socio-cultural, and political changes wrought by transportation automobilization; these suggest that it may have been one of the most significant world-scale revolutions of the past century. A growing body of historical evidence points to how the use of vehicles propelled by internal combustion and diesel engines (today’s ubiquitous cars, automobiles, lorries and trucks) changed lives across national, cultural, and continental boundaries, from the top-down spread of global manufacturing and distribution systems to the cross-cultural diffusion of both futuristic dreams about life-enhancing autonomous vehicles and apocalyptic nightmares about automobile dependency. Automobilization thus requires analysis as a world-historical set of changes.

Increased reliance on automobiles since 1900 has profoundly affected how populations faced the challenges of housing, employment, and access to foods, medicines, and social engagement. These processes have continued to evolve alongside the rise of environmental, ecological, and health concerns over the human scale and sustainability of this global automobile revolution (in turn prompting further automobilization efforts in new technological directions, such as the invention of electric cars). Concomitant changes whose consequences are only now coming into scholarly focus, such as the de-pedestrianization of urban life and humans’ increased sedentariness, require analysis as transnational historical phenomena.

The need for a serious examination of these global events is motivated by the significant degree to which both urban and rural spaces since the 1800s have been altered, rebuilt, and even designed to fit the logistical needs of automobiles. Moreover, scholars exploring the cultural, social and political effects of automobilization have also stressed that the changes made to spaces and networks, especially in pre-existing urban contexts, were not just a result of automobilizing processes but also of conscious projects promoting automobilism, even individualistic automobilism, most famously in automobile manufacturers’ promotion of the car as a more desirable mode of movement than public transportation. Such projects were often propelled by ideological and even mythical celebrations of automobiles as vectors for various discourses of modernity with deep political and economic resonance (such as celebrations of individualism, developmentalism, and the technologicalization of daily life). Historical investigations into automobility have also begun to trace the dialectical interplay between automobilism and the reactive projects of anti-automobilism and re-pedestrianization that have recently become globally prominent.

 

Submission due date: May 1, 2019. PLEASE NOTE that all submissions must be made using the Journal of World History’s online platform, https://jwh.msubmit.net: questions about the online submission system should be directed to journal@hawaii.edu.

Contact Info: 

Journal of World History

Contact Email: 

journal@hawaii.edu

URL: 

https://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jwh/

1914 Grand Prix Delage update

AHA member and ABC presenter Jon Faine recently did a segment on the 7:30 Report of great interest to automotive enthusiasts and historians - about the cloning of the engine block of the 1914 Grand Prix Delage here in Victoria. You can view Jon’s segment here

 1914 Grand Prix Delarge

1914 Grand Prix Delarge

This marvel of 3D printing was overseen by another AHA member, Phil Guilfoyle, who presented a paper about the project at last year’s AHA conference. It’s terrific viewing and a great companion piece to Phil’s paper, which is also available now at this link.

Ron Tauranac AO Honoured

The patron of Automotive Historians Australia, Ron Tauranac AO, has been inaugurated into the Australian Motorsport Hall of Fame.

In the Hall of Fame's second year, Ron joins last year’s inductee and fellow engineer Phil Irving in the special category reserved for “off track” contributions. While noting that Ron was a very proficient driver in his younger days, it is significant that CAMS has seen fit to include people who designed and engineered such successful racing machinery in the honour roll.

After the weekend event, I spoke with Ron who was typically humble about it all, and conveyed our delight in this very important recognition of his contribution to motorsport. It is certainly fitting that both B and T, Brabham and Tauranac, are recognised by Hall of Fame membership, with Ron regarded as the most successful designer of production racing cars in the history of motorsport.

TL

Australian Ford Archives - An Update

Some 12 months ago it was discovered Ford Australia planned to ship their archives to Detroit. The Ford archives had originally been put together by the late Adrian Ryan, Motoring Journalist, commentator and enthusiast, then working as Ford’s head of Public Affairs.

The archive material expanded once Ford announced closure of manufacturing with all suitable old material located to Broadmeadows. Archivist, Michelle Cook was then told to box the material up for shipment overseas.

Word spread quickly resulting in ex Ford employee, Peter Fry, leading a movement to preserve the Ford Archives in Australia. Wheels magazine ran a story in their September 2016 issue, urging readers to write to the Minister and Ford expressing concern.

See https://www.wheelsmag.com.au/news/1609/ford-faithfuls-fight-to-keep-australian-archive

The AHA also took up the matter with local politicians, receiving support from the Hon Martin Foley MP, who wrote supporting our concern to the Minister responsible, Hon. Mitch Fifield who has now advised that Ford require an export permit as the archive was reregulated under the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act.

Fifield’s Dept advised Ford they needed a licence and to date have not applied for one.

The good news is Ford’s archivist has been employed for a further 12 months suggesting perhaps the archive will be rehoused in Australian Institutes, and be available for local research.Some 12 months ago it was discovered Ford Australia planned to ship their archives to Detroit. The Ford archives had originally been put together by the late Adrian Ryan, Motoring Journalist, commentator and enthusiast, then working as Ford’s head of Public Affairs.

 

The archive material expanded once Ford announced closure of manufacturing with all suitable old material located to Broadmeadows. Archivist, Michelle Cook was then told to box the material up for shipment overseas.

Word spread quickly resulting in ex Ford employee, Peter Fry, leading a movement to preserve the Ford Archives in Australia. Wheels magazine ran a story in their September 2016 issue, urging readers to write to the Minister and Ford expressing concern.  See 

The AHA also took up the matter with local politicians, receiving support from the Hon Martin Foley MP, who wrote supporting our concern to the Minister responsible, Hon. Mitch Fifield who has now advised that Ford require an export permit as the archive was reregulated under the Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act.

Fifield’s Dept advised Ford they needed a licence and to date have not applied for one.

The good news is Ford’s archivist has been employed for a further 12 months suggesting perhaps the archive will be rehoused in Australian Institutes, and be available for local research.

NAD

Historic 1920s motor garage becomes facade for new Arts Hub in Hobart

 University of Tasmania has announced the name for their new performing arts hub – The Hedberg – an acknowledgement that part of the new building’s site was once the Hedberg Brothers 1925 purpose built two storey motor showroom and workshop. Only the façade of the Hedberg Garage will remain at the completion of the arts hub construction

 The Hedbergs were motor engineers in Hobart in the inter-war years. Of their new 1926 premises the Hobart Mercury noted – “HEDBERG'S GARAGE. Messrs. Hedberg Bros. have removed from Brisbane Street….spacious new premises in Lower Collins Street, where general repairs are being effected and sale of the Moon cars made. There is large garage space on the ground floor, at the rear of which is situated the workshop with a showroom in front. The offices are located on the first floor”.

[Motor Notes (1926, January 23). The Mercury (Hobart, Tas. : 1860 - 1954), p. 6. Retrieved January 20, 2017 http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29127649

“The former Hedberg Bros. Garage is a relatively rare surviving example of an early commercial garage that retains its ability to demonstrate its use and features. (Pg.4)
…….. The loss of physical fabric with the partial demolition of the former Hedberg Garage does impact upon the significance of the place.
The proposed Academy will however bring with it an opportunity for considerable enhancement of heritage within the precinct.”(Pg. 6)

[Hobart City Council. Supporting Assessment Information. Development and Environmental Services Committee Meeting Monday 20 October 2014.

An interesting discussion of the pros and cons of partial demolition of a heritage building can be found here https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwiO_fv8ms_RAhXEjJQKHa9uDwAQFggZMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hobartcity.com.au%2Ffiles%2F0abbf6b8-ab2a-4b0e-896b-a3c6010fdcd1%2F201014_Supporting_Information_-_Item_632.pdf&usg=AFQjCNEuD-xMfIgSfcPFazmK56tHZ4PFJg&sig2=rT05c7Gn_jtBUM9y0a3ThA&bvm=bv.144224172,d.dGo&cad=rja